—   Spring Special   —   25% off

Spring Special

Spring Special

Everything is blooming and so does The Rest. To celebrate, we are offering our annual subscription with a 25% discount. As a paying subscriber you get:

  • A handpicked song delivered to your inbox every weekday (smartlink to music platforms)
  • A “Wow, I didn't know that!” background story
  • Full access to the complete archive
  • Full access to the comments section incl. inputs from the community
  • An ad-free experience across all channels of The Rest

The Rest presents a song and an insightful story about it every weekday.

You can enjoy the song on your preferred streaming platform while the story will give you something to ponder and discuss with your family, friends and colleagues.

Learn more about The Rest here.

A Heartbreaking Eulogy by an Andy Warhol-Endorsed Ex-Model

A Heartbreaking Eulogy by an Andy Warhol-Endorsed Ex-Model

Lenny Bruce’s legacy is undoubtedly a great one: The American comedian, who is no. 3 on Comedy Central’s list of the 100 Greatest Stand-ups of All Time, brought a more political aspect to the stand-up scene of the 1950s and 60s, which up to that point mainly was about telling silly jokes. Over the course of his career, Bruce acquired a big fan base, including various intellectuals and members of the arts community. However, his performances, which dealt with politics, religion and sex, also caused him much trouble: Bruce faced several lawsuits for obscenity—and finally was found guilty in 1964. This verdict made comedy club owners across the country blacklist Bruce as they feared prosecution for allowing obscenity. During that time, Bruce, who was known for his drug addiction, started consuming heroin, methamphetamine and other substances on a daily basis. In August 1966, the comedian died, presumably from a heroin overdose, only 40 years of age. His notable influence on and popularity among fellow artists became visible once again just after his death: A memorial service held in New York was attended by beat poet Allen Ginsberg and jazz bassist Charlie Haden, among others—and in the months to follow, many artists paid tribute to the comedian in one way or another. Model-turned-singer Christa Päffgen, who was one of pop art innovator Andy Warhol’s muses, was among them. Nico, as Päffgen called herself on stage, closed her 1967 album Chelsea Girl with an equally explicit and heartbreaking eulogy to Bruce, moaning at one point: “And why after every last shot was there always another?”

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Don't Forget: Eye Wey Dey Cry No Dey See Road!

Don't Forget: Eye Wey Dey Cry No Dey See Road!

In 2016, scientists at the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute conducted a comprehensive study that proved what seems obvious: you shouldn’t get behind the wheel while being emotionally stirred up. The research included more than 3,500 participants and showed that the risk of crashing increases nearly tenfold when driving in an angry, sad or upset state of mind. 

The popular Nigerian proverb "eye wey dey cry no dey see road" is based on the idea the researchers examined. Literally the pidgin saying means that "a crying eye cannot see the road." In the figurative sense it suggests that you might not make the best decisions when you’re overwhelmed with emotions or in a state of distress. 

On her debut EP, Bagetti uses the proverb, underpinning the encouraging message of her melancholic yet strong Kizomba-inspired breakup song “Hard Girl”. If you listen closely, you realize that the Nigerian singer isn’t just talking about the emotions you deal with during a breakup that make you a hazardous road user, but also about the means you use to distract yourself from the situation: “Pour me the whisky, two shot with Tequila, yeah-yeah,” Bagetti demands at one point 🥲

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When the Creator of Barcelona’s “Best Club Night” Does Disco

When the Creator of Barcelona’s “Best Club Night” Does Disco

Philip Agee left the CIA in 1969. Later, when asked why, he replied: "I fell in love with a woman who thought Che Guevara was the most wonderful man in the world.” In fact, he was so disgusted by the actions of the CIA in Latin America that he moved to London and began working against his former employer. In 1976, he collaborated with Time Out magazine and published the names of 60 alleged CIA agents stationed in England. For Time Out, a London-centered underground listings magazine where decisions were initially arrived at through collective consensus and all workers received equal compensation, this act of subversion represented its deeply entrenched left-wing politics. Today, there is not much left of this attitude and activism. Time Out now covers over 300 cities worldwide and is a publicly traded company. Nevertheless, this transformation from David to Goliath has scarcely diminished its reputation as a reliable event listings magazine. Those who earn a spot on the best lists for events experience a boost in audience numbers. Wekaforé Jibril can tell you a thing or two about it. Originally from Nigeria, he moved to Bilbao in 2016 to study fashion. Shortly after, he made his way to Barcelona and decided to start the club night Voodoo Club. His motivation? He was fed up with how Black and queer people were often mistreated or turned away at club doors. In 2021, Voodoo Club was voted the “Best Club Night” in Barcelona by Time Out. The success of his party series overshadows Wekaforé's other talents. One of them is writing and producing music. The best example of this: "Solid Jacket", a disco-inspired collaboration with Ninja Tune- and The xx-associated Spanish producer Pional.  

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